Category Archives: Uncategorized

Amy Rankin

2009-2-1-amy-rankin

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Rankin, Amy                       

Title/Date: Rabbit, 2009

Description of the work:

Rabbit is a color etching by American artist Amy Rankin. The work depicts a human figure, probably a female figure, in a crouching position with both hands over the head. This figure wears a costume of a rabbit complete with rabbit feet and the face is uncovered by the lifting of the mask. The feature of the figure suggests a female looking downward. The figure is placed at the center of the composition which resembles an empty room divided by bands of yellow and purple.

The figure is the sole object within the composition, as well as the focal point. In terms of use of space, the composition does not give the viewer a sense of depth, Rankin uses light and shadow to create some dimensionality in a two-dimensional space. Rankin uses the complementary colors purple and yellow as a backdrop that is subordinate to the central figure. The top half of the composition where Rankin uses purple seems to utilize a heavier coat of paint in comparison to the lower half which uses yellow. The lower half uses a lighter coat of paint as one can see the brush strokes as well as the white of the material. The central and main figure is not depicted as a realistic interpretation of a human figure, rather a stylized version of one. Light and shadow are used but mainly in the lower leg areas part of the torso and the shadow of the figures in the yellow section. However, shadows are not represented near the arms or the face of the figure. The work gives the viewer the sense of turmoil or sadness. The fetal position of the figure, as well as the rosy cheeks of the figure suggest sadness.

Artist’s Biography:

Amy Rankin is an American artist from New Mexico. For more than 20 years, Rankin has worked in various disciplines that is reflected in her work. Some of these disciplines include printmaking, painting and drawing.  Her portfolio of work seem to suggest that she is interested in human form, as well as the raw emotion it produces. In her artist’s statement, Rankin says that every human being has a path. Fortunate humans find a path, as well as strength to continue till the end. Rankin tries to achieve a point where her ideas and imagery can come together to form a complete work. It is meant to be a reflection on the contemplation of life and its processes. This includes the process of growth, learning and change; she depicts both of this directly and metaphorically in her work. Rankin takes inspiration from material objects and living forms which allow her to use them as subtle metaphors as the subject matter for her compositions.  Although she has her own intention of ideas for her work to convey, ultimately, she leaves them up for interpretation from the audience.

 As a native New Mexican, Rankin currently lives in Taos, New Mexico.  However, she holds an MFA from New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. In an invitation for a 2013 Art Reception, sponsored by Pueblo Community College, Colorado, Rankin’s description states that she has been an instructor in the Art Department of The University of New Mexico in Taos since 2005. Currently, she is the coordinator of public programs, as well as Interim of visitor services and store manager at the Hardwood Museum of Art located in Taos, New Mexico.

FACTS          

Signed: etching of monogram of A R lower recto corner  

Date and dimension: frame size 9 ½” x 12 ½” sight size 9” x 12”; 2009                 

Medium: Copper and Solar etching

Accession # and Acquisition Date: 2009.02.01 Date: 2009

Condition: Framed, Excellent

Provenance and Exhibitions: Selections from the Permanent Collection, 09′ and 13′    

Framed or Flat: Framed

Current location: This piece is part of the University Art Gallery’s permanent collection at New Mexico State University

Bibliography:

-Judith Kendall webpage, Amy Rankin portfolio section http://www.judithkendall.com/artist_portfolio.php?ID=56 accessed 20 November 2016

-Hardwood Museum webpagehttp://www.harwoodmuseum.org/ accessed 20 November 2016

-Colorado State Fair 2013, http://i.saffireevent.com/files.ashx?t=fg&f=13fainsertweb.pdf&rid=ColoradoStateFair accessed 20 November 2016

Reproductions: N/A

Researched By: Jesus Zubia, 20 November 2016    

Nancy Frost Begin- Defiant Lizard

h2011-76-nancy-frost

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Begin, Nancy Frost

Title/Date: Defiant Lizard, 2010

Description of the work:

A lizard perching in a rock in the midst of wild grass and the textured terrain with different sizes stones and grasses. The lizard is lighter in shade as compared to the deep darkness of the surroundings. This lizard in located in the upper section of the composition. This woodcut print artistically represents the desert terrain, along with clean-cut strokes of grass blades, both green bushes and dry ones as well. The composition captures the scene during spring or summer time when lizard roam around gardens. The lizard’s body is the lighter section of the composition with black-and-white spots, and four small red spots around the neck and in the lower section of the belly. The background in dark, probably indicating night time, and the foliage around is colored with different shades of green while the rocks are in light blue. Additional to this physical appearance of the lizard, Begin’s lizard has a defiant expression of alertness, being always on guard for its own safety.

Biography:

Nancy Begin was born on 21 July 1946 and raised in Buffalo, NY. As an artist, Begin, according to her personal website, was constantly on a voyage of discovery, not so much to reproduce what is in front of her but to seek new landscapes with new eyes. She felt the challenge was hopeful and endless. Her development as an artist was nurtured by a very supportive artistic family. Following her Bachelor of Fine Arts graduation from Syracuse University, she expressed herself through various artistic pursuits including illustration, fiber arts, clay, wood and painting. She taught studio art and art history at Proctor Academy in New Hampshire and was a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen where she exhibited contemporary folk art. In 1996, Begin was selected by the League to create New Hampshire’s contribution to the White House Christmas tree. After relocating to New Mexico in 2007, she finds Las Cruces to be a rich, artistic history in the “Land of Enchantment” a most supportive and inspirational environment to continue along the challenging, artistic road of discovery.

Nancy’s watercolors, oils, woodcut prints and folk art have been represented in fine galleries throughout the country. Most recently she completed an art book of the Crow series entitled “Cautionary Tales”. The book will be available on her website soon as well as continuation of the same series. After relocating to Las Cruces, New Mexico in 2007, she finds the rich, artistic history in the “land of enchantment” a most supportive and inspirational environment to continue along the challenging, artistic road of discovery. Nancy won several awards from 2012 to 2014 in New Mexico, El Paso and The American West.

FACTS

Signed: signed Nancy Begin Frost, on the lower right hand corner. 1/25 number of print edition, being indicated at the center; and the title handwritten towards the left side.

Date and dimension: 2010, Image: 12” x 12”; Framed: 20” x 20”

Medium: Color Woodcut print.

Provenance and Exhibitions: UNK

Framed or flat: Framed and mounted on mat.

Current location: The piece is a part of the New Mexico State University’s permanent collections.

Bibliography:

Nancy Frost Begin http://nancyfrostbegin.net Accessed on 11 November 2016.

-The Cutter Gallery Fine Arts Jewelry, 2016. http://thecuttergallery.com/events/ Accessed December 7, 2016.

Reproductions: UNK

Researched by: Latha Sankaran, 11 November 2016.

Nancy Frost Begin- Close to Home

h2011-77-nancy-frost

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Begin, Nancy Frost

Title/Date: Close to Home, 2010

Description of the work:  

The barns with few cattle grazing are expressed by watercolor painting along with the ground capped with snow. The sky is lit very mildly with light, indicating a cold winter landscape. The trees on the left side of the composition are beautifully portrayed with twigs exposed and the leaves being held in frost.

Begin expresses her artistic pursuits in a winter landscape, beautifully captured by watercolor painting, depicting a huge barn almost in the center of the composition. Cows are shown grazing in some clear areas, whereas the entire remaining land is covered by snow. The cattle are protected by barbed-wire fence apart from a small portion of white painted wooden fence. They are also shown to have sufficient space to move around or even graze. The painting seems to be gloomily lit with the reflective light of the snow. The trees behind the barn also portray a winter scene. The sloped metal roof of the barn indicates enough ceiling space inside the barn. It also shows that any snow would slide down the slope to the ground at some point of time. Begin does title this picture as Close to Home indicating the cattle being closer to their barn, where they could all move into, in the middle of the cold winter. The title indicates a suitable shelter, expecting warmth relatively compared to the exterior.

Biography:

Nancy Begin was born on 21 July 1946 and raised in Buffalo, NY. As an artist, Begin was constantly on a voyage of discovery, not so much to reproduce what is in front of her but to seek new landscapes with new eyes. She felt the challenge was hopeful and endless. Her development as an artist was nurtured by a very supportive artistic family. Following her Bachelor of Fine Arts graduation from Syracuse University, she expressed herself through various artistic pursuits including illustration, fiber arts, clay, wood and painting.  She taught studio art and art history at Proctor Academy in New Hampshire and was a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen where she exhibited contemporary folk art. In 1996, Begin was selected by the League to create New Hampshire’s contribution to the White House Christmas tree. After relocating to New Mexico in 2007, she finds Las Cruces to be a rich, artistic history in the “Land of Enchantment” a most supportive and inspirational environment to continue along the challenging, artistic road of discovery.

Nancy’s watercolors, oils, woodcut prints and folk art have been represented in fine galleries throughout the country. Most recently she completed an art book of the Crow series entitled “Cautionary Tales”. The book will be available on her website soon as well as continuation of the same series. After relocating to Las Cruces, New Mexico in 2007, she finds the rich, artistic history in the “land of enchantment” a most supportive and inspirational environment to continue along the challenging, artistic road of discovery. Nancy won several awards from 2012 to 2014 in New Mexico, El Paso and The American West.

FACTS

Signed: Nancy Begin Frost is hand-signed on the lower right hand side, recto and also on the verso, which can be viewed.

Date and dimension: 2010, Image: 20in x 27in; Framed: 21.5in x 29in.

Medium: Watercolor.  

Accession # and Acquisition date:  acc. # H2011.77; 2010.

Condition: Excellent

Provenance and the Exhibits: Provenance: UNK, N/A

Framed: Framed and mounted with mat.

Current location:  The piece is a part of the New Mexico State University’s permanent collections.

Bibliography:

Nancy Frost Begin.  http://nancyfrostbegin.net/ Accessed December 7, 2016.

-The Cutter Gallery Fine Arts Jewelry. http://thecuttergallery.com/  Accessed December 7, 2016.

-Abatemarco, Michael. Exhibitionism: Marigold Arts Group Show, January 3 2014. New Mexican’s Weekly Magazine of Arts, Entertainment & Culture http://www.santafenewmexican.com/pasatiempo/art/exhibitionism/exhibitionism-marigold-arts-group-show/article_5be82ed6-f7ab-5fee-bcbb-a3b02f462cef.html , Accessed December 7, 2016.

Reproductions: N/A

Researched by: Latha Sankaran, 11 November 2016.         

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith

2000-2-2_jaune-smith

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Smith, Jaune Quick-to-See                      

Title/Date: Habitat Isn’t Just for Wildlife, 1997.

Description of the work:

This screen-print is composed of three separate colored layers of blue, red, and black. The blue images are placed against textured, lighter blue background of an overview of a landscape including drawings related to the Old West such as wagons, simple houses surrounded by birds, trees, leaves, and a Native-American cardinal points emblem. The red layer is superimposed against the entire landscape with the outline profile of a horse. The third layer consists of black text on the upper and lower sections of the composition: Look before you link. coming diagonally from the head of the horse and Habitat Isn’t Just for Wildlife framed in a box on the bottom center of the composition.

The work addresses the relationships between the land and the life which inhabits it. The landscape helps to highlight the space which all life shares, placing people, their structures, and the natural habitat around it into a single context. The text addresses this as well, placing an emphasis on the usual separation of humans and nature in Western thinking, asking the viewer to reconsider this relationship. There is a concern with the ethnographic and historical distance we place on nature and on Native American cultures. As a Native American activist, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith uses the horse to represent the strain that Western culture has had on indigenous land and societies.

Artist’s Biography:

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith was born at St. Ignatius Jesuit Mission on the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Reservation in 1940. Her father was an accomplished horse trainer and trader whom her and her sister lived with after their mother abandoned them when she was two years old. They were mostly poor and accompanied their father in his travels spending part of their lives in foster homes. She is a member of the Flathead Nation and descendent of French Cree and Shoshone ancestors. She gained contact with the tribe after she became a successful artist in the 1970s. She was introduced to art in the Public School system as a child and received her BA in art Education at Framingham State College in Massachusetts in 1976 and her MA at the University of New Mexico in 1980.

Smith’s work has often focused on educational projects, organizing artist collectives, curation exhibits, as well as giving lectures, panels, talks, and workshops. She considers herself an artist and cultural worker with her work often being political in nature dealing with issues about the relationship between land and its inhabitants. The main focus of her work deals with inhabited landscapes using collage, drawing and other media creating tactile and complex surfaces inspired by the works of modern artists such as Pablo Picasso, Paul Keel, and Robert Rauschenberg. She’s often looking to question our assumptions of history asking questions about what Native American art is and should look like, mixing cultural symbols from popular cultural and Native traditions creating a tension between imposing ideas about indigenous beliefs.

FACTS                   

Signed: Signed first and last names, Jaune Smith, in pencil, not including her Native name, in the bottom right corner of the image.  

Date and dimension: 1997; Full paper size: 31 ¼” x23 ¼” Print: 24” x 16″ 

Medium: Screenprint

Accession # and Acquisition Date: acc #: 2000.02.02b Date: 2000

Condition: excellent

Provenance and Exhibitions: UNK

Framed or Flat: Framed

Current location: This piece is a part of the permanent collection at New Mexico State University art gallery.

Bibliography:

 – Berlo, Janet Catherine and Ruth B. Phillips, “The North,” in Native North

American Art (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015), 165-205.

– Lawrence Abbot ed., “Jaune Quick-to-See Smith,” in I Stand in the Center of the

Good: Interviews with Native American Artists (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1994) 209-232.

Reproductions: N/A

Researched By: Saul Ramirez, 24 November 2016   

Mary Bauermeister- Art Investment Report

1980-10-01-no-frame

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Bauermeister, Mary

Title: Art Investment Report, 1973

Description of the Work:

The composition is divided into two sections: the upper portion of the page contains three drawings and the lower is a sea of sentences which organically flow to the bottom of the page. The first two drawings of the upper portion resemble that of a filing cabinet and art easel chopped in half then reassembled. The words art and investment float out of the filing cabinet drawers. The third drawing on the far right has the word report trailing out of a broken box shape with several spiraling piles littering the top section. The drawings are quite intricate and the lines that compose them jump with an electrified quality in some places.

The lower section of the drawing is a stream of thoughts which appear illegibly small in some locations and then jump out in all capital letters in others. Words that appear to leap from the page include profit, tax saving and market demands. The text contains phrases like the art market out- performed the stock market in the BOOM of the 1950s and should you buy one expensive pain-ting or a whole collection of cheaper paintings. This piece seems to both critically and playfully ask questions about the art market; the irony being that is it an art piece itself. This artwork asks the viewer to reconsider the idea of value and how art is an investment.

Artist’s Biography:

Mary Bauermeister was born in Germany in 1934 and attended Staatliche Saarländische Schule für Kunst und Handwerk in Saarbrücken during the 50’s. She eventually moved to Cologne and opened a studio named Atelier Lintgasse 28, which often hosted avant-garde musical performances.

Her passion for music led her to the Internationalen Ferienkurse für Neue Musik in 1961. This same year, she wrote a book called Score for Painters which theorizes how to apply techniques of music composition to visual art forms. Her artwork focuses of the rhythmic ordering of space, repetition and spontaneity, which all take a role in music. Her work also has been associated with a revival of Dadaism. Her work resonates with the same anti-establishment ideas of Post WWI Dada art and the reintroduction of these themes come from her experience as a child living in Germany, Post WWII. After seeing a world ravaged by war, she questions art, mortality, religion and the cosmos.

Her work is found in many collections including The Museum of Modern Art, The Solomon R. Guggenheim, The Whitney Museum, The Brooklyn Museum, and has been exhibited internationally.

FACTS

Signed: Lower Left, M. Bauermeister 1973

Date and Dimension: 1973, In Frame: 30″x24.5″, Print: 25″x19″

Medium: Lithograph

Accession #: 1980.10.1

Edition: 92/250

Condition: Excellent

Provenance and Exhibitions: N/A

Framed or Flat: Framed

Current Location: This piece is part of the University Art Gallery’s permanent collections at New Mexico State University.

Bibliography:

-http://www.heckscher.org/pages.php?which_page=collection_image_detail&which_image=1980_006_001

-http://clara.nmwa.org/index.php?g=entity_detail&entity_id=477

-http://www.artnet.com/artists/mary-bauermeister/biography

-http://www.askart.com/artist/artist/88884/artist.aspx

-https://www.smith.edu/artmuseum/On-View/Past-Exhibitions/MARY-BAUERMEISTER-The-New-York-Decade/Themes-and-Motifs

Reproductions: N/A

Researched by: Jennifer Abeyta, 1 December 2016

Mary Bauermeister- Rainbow

1980-10-2_mary-bauemister

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Bauermeister, Mary

Title: Rainbow, 1973

Description of the Work:

Plain white background as her base, Bauermeister creates two intersecting diagonal bands of color across the page. The central band transitions from red and goes through the color spectrum down to the blue on the bottom. The colors jump from this spectrum and there are strokes of color appearing rhythmically across the band, rounded by the motion of the hand. Black lettering and circular designs decorate the page, appearing like the calculations on the whiteboard of a scientist. The subjects of these writings include the words galaxies, solar systems, sex, energy and god. There is also a repetition of the words cancer and sickness. Phrases appear such as sickness-physical symptom of mental cause and sickness caused by lack of love.

Bauermeister’s conglomerations of circular designs, in this context, can be read on the cellular scale relating to cancer growth, as well as, the macro scale referring to the cosmos. The piece has an investigative quality which pulls into its formula the color spectrum, as well as the micro and the macro of human experience.

Artist’s Biography:

Mary Bauermeister was born in Germany in 1934 and attended Staatliche Saarländische Schule für Kunst und Handwerk in Saarbrücken during the 50’s. She eventually moved to Cologne and opened a studio named Atelier Lintgasse 28, which often hosted avant-garde musical performances.

Her passion for music led her to the Internationalen Ferienkurse für Neue Musik in 1961. This same year, she wrote a book called Score for Painters which theorizes how to apply techniques of music composition to visual art forms. Her artwork focuses of the rhythmic ordering of space, repetition and spontaneity, which all take a role in music. Her work also has been associated with a revival of Dadaism. Her work resonates with the same anti-establishment ideas of Post WWI Dada art and the reintroduction of these themes come from her experience as a child living in Germany, Post WWII. After seeing a world ravaged by war, she questions art, mortality, religion and the cosmos.

Her work is found in many collections including The Museum of Modern Art, The Solomon R. Guggenheim, The Whitney Museum, The Brooklyn Museum, and has been exhibited internationally.

FACTS

Signed: Lower Left, Mary Bauermeister 1973

Date and Dimension: 1973, Frame: 30.25″x24″, Print: 25.5″x19″

Medium: Lithograph

Accession #: 1980.10.2

Edition: 32/250

Condition: Good

Provenance and Exhibitions: N/A

Framed or Flat: Framed

Current Location: This piece is part of the University Art Gallery’s permanent collections at New Mexico State University.

Bibliography:

-http://www.heckscher.org/pages.php?which_page=collection_image_detail&which_image=1980_006_002

-http://clara.nmwa.org/index.php?g=entity_detail&entity_id=477

-http://www.artnet.com/artists/mary-bauermeister/biography

-http://www.askart.com/artist/artist/88884/artist.aspx

-https://www.smith.edu/artmuseum/On-View/Past-Exhibitions/MARY-BAUERMEISTER-The-New-York-Decade/Themes-and-Motifs

Reproductions: N/A

Researched By: Jennifer Abeyta, 8 November 2016

Amanda Jaffe

2011-03-jaffe-cat-and-dog-fur-patterns

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Jaffe, Amanda         

Title: Cat & Dog Fur Patterns, 1988

Description of the work:  

This piece is a tile mural, composed of 120-two inch square tiles. The coloration and patterning on the tiles are inspired by the fur of cats and dogs. The hair on the left side and middle rectangle are a mixture of yellow and black while the wedge shaped set of tiles on the right are light brown and white. The fur texture from one tile does not always align to the texture on the adjoining piece. The tiles have the appearance of being mixed and turned, drawing the eye in every direction.

Jaffe’s tile mural is a mixture of organic decoration with geometric construction. Each square offers a close-up look at a small section of spotted and speckled fur. This piece, like many of Jaffe’s work, allows the viewer a chance to connect with the products of nature and its splendor. The tiles are made from a Cone 5 slip which is cast in plaster molds. The casts are then incised and colored with underglaze

Artist’s Biography:

Amanda Jaffe began her work as an artist in the 1970’s, working in mixed media installations. Jaffe’s ceramic art was inspired by Roman and Byzantine mosaics from Italy as well as Islamic tiles from Spain and North Africa. She uses bright colors and asymmetrical carved designs in her tiles which are usually inspired by nature and water. Her work, while usually small in scale is incredibly intricate and visually harmonious.

Jaffe is a Professor emeritus from New Mexico State University who taught ceramics in the Department of Art from 1985-2011 and was an inspiration to her students and a number of artists. Her work has been exhibited across the nation from Los Angeles, CA to New York, NY. Her work is held in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts (Houston), Wichita Center for the Arts, the Archie Bray Foundation, and many more. Since retiring, Jaffe is still actively making art.

FACTS      

Signed: N/A 

Date and dimension: 1988, Frame: 27.5″x23.5″, Tiles: 23.5″x19.5″, Each tile: 2″x2″

Medium: White earthenware with underglaze

Accession #:  2011.03

Condition: Fair

Provenance and Exhibitions: 2011 “Looking Back/Looking Forward: 1978-2011, A Retrospective,” University Art Gallery, Las Cruces, NM.

Framed or Flat: Framed    

Current location: This piece is part of the University Art Gallery’s permanent collections at New Mexico State University.

Bibliography:

-Kane, Suzanne. “The Cultivated Ceramics of Amanda Jaffe.” Ceramics Technical, no. 21 (2005): 47-49.

-Held, Peter “Amanda Jaffe: Infinite Space.” Retrieved from http://amandajaffe.com/retrospective-catalog.html

-http://amandajaffe.com/about.html

Reproductions: N/A

Researched By: Jennifer Abeyta, 13 November 2016

Lynda Benglis

1980-11-5-lynda-bengils

THE WORK AND THE ARTIST

Artist: Benglis, Lynda

Title/Date: #9, 1979

Description of the work:

The work is a large-scale, mixed-media original, on handmade paper with a deckled edge. It is constructed of flowing diagonal, organic lines of colored string. Teased and frayed into differing lengths, they are laid in parallel and perpendicular patterns directly into the pulp, and became part of the paper as it dried. Benglis has said that she is on a quest to capture the “frozen gesture.” In that spirit, there is a leaf of tissue paper affixed over a pastel watercolor butterfly in the center of the composition. The biomorphic shape floats in and on in a fanciful illusion on the upper section of the paper over a pink diamond shape.

The process of making paper dates back to China 25-220AD. Benglis has a fascination with it and has worked with handmade paper for years. She continues to incorporate it in her most recent mixed-media work.

Artist’s Biography:

Lynda Benglis achieved early and lasting notoriety when she appeared in the November 1974 edition of Artforum magazine wearing nothing but a pair of cat’s eye sunglasses and gripping an enormous dildo. The effect was seismic: two of the magazine’s editors resigned and the two-page ad has since become one of the iconic images of feminist art history.

Benglis was born October 25 1941 in Lake Charles, LA, and she is the eldest of five.  After earning a BFA from Newcomb College, she moved to New York City in 1964 and became a leader of Postinimalism along with Richard Serra, Eva Hesse and Bruce Nauman. Like many women artists, Benglis looked for a medium not owned and corrupted by men. Her poured latex, wax and foam work was a feminist counterpoint to the ubiquitous male dominated painting and sculpture art scene of the 1960s. Her early works were an amalgam of feminine organics and confrontations that mixed contemporary imagery with media of sensuality and gender stereotypes. In the 1970s, Benglis radical video work, sexual images and eroticized performances confronted the societal representation of women and were labeled trivial, rootless by many critics. As a result, her work was ignored for years. It has only been in the last decade that Benglis has begun to receive recognition for her significant, innovative contributions to late twentieth and early twenty-first century art. She was the first artist to make sculptures out of paint, eliminating the canvas and creating directly on the floor, using walls and corners to form the shape. Outrageous and provocative, Benglis challenged popular taste and definitions of art.

Lynda Benglis has become known for her biomorphic shapes and forms, and unusual pairings of materials with the subject of sexual politics in the course of her 50 years as an artist. She continues to explore the juxtaposition of mass and surface, texture and gesture through the use of a wide range of mediums.

Lynda’s artistry has earned her a Guggenheim Fellowship, grants from the NEA, visiting professorships and a 36-page impressive curriculum of awards and collections held by esteemed galleries and museums from Tat Modern to the Whitney and National Gallery of Art. She has participated in solo and group exhibitions all over the world, including 2016 with list of 12 shows in Italy, Mexico, Norway, and New York City. Lynda Benglis currently lives, travels and works in Santa Fe, New York City, Greece and India.

FACTS

Signed:  #9 L Benglis 12/79 recto, lower left graphite.

Date and Dimension:  1979; Image 35” x 27 ¾”; Mat 37” x 30”                   

Medium:  Hand-made paper, Mixed media.

Accession and Acquisition: #1980.11.5 Date: 1980

Condition: Good.

Provenance and Exhibitions: UNK. There is no documentation, the piece has ever been exhibited.

Framed or Flat:  Unframed, free floating on mat.         

Current Location: Piece is part of the University Art Gallery’s permanent collections at New Mexico State University.

Bibliography:

-Cheim & Read, Lynda Benglis, retrieved from http://www.cheimread.com/artists/lynda-benglis

Woman’s Art Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1 (Spring – Summer, 1992), p. 54, accessed November 8, 2016, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1358269

-Hickey, Dave and Lebovici, Elisabeth. Lynda Benglis, Les Presses Du Reel 2009 -http://www.art21.org/artists/lynda-benglis, accessed November 10, 2016.

-http://www.theartstory.org/artist-benglis-lynda.htm, accessed November 10, 2016.

– http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/25/arts/design/25benglis.html, accessed November 10, 2016

Reproductions:  UNK

Researched by:  Carleen Cirillo, November 2016